58 entries

Articles by Kalpana Mohan

Hey, I Need Cash!

cash, noun. 1590-1600; < Portuguese caixa < Tamil kaacu copper coin < Sanskrit karsa a weight (of precious metal) While he was being molded in the model of a valley success story, he began questioning whether he wanted to be another cog in the wheel of technology. A gargantuan brown garbage container greeted ...

Off With the Loot

loot, noun. goods stolen during pillaging, as in wartime, during riots, etc;goods, money, etc, obtained illegally; (informal) money or wealth. From Hindi lu:t 1788, from Sanskrit loptram, lotram.

The Churidar Gets a Nod

churidar, noun. long tight-fitting trousers, worn by Indian men and women. Also called churidar pyjamas. From Hindi.

The House Of Teak

teak, noun. A large East Indian tree, of the verbena family, yielding a hard, durable, resinous, yellowish-brown wood used for shipbuilding, making furniture, etc.

The Call Of The Koel

The call of the koel will always remind me of the collapse of a nest.

That Downward Dog at Yoga

yoga: a school of Hindu philosophy advocating a course of physical and mental disciplines for attaining union of the self with the Supreme Being or ultimate principle.

Not Just Another Jute Bag

On a trip to West Bengal,  the author gets a close-up view of the human story of her jute bag.

Sheesh! So Much Bakshish!

bakshish [bak-sheesh]: noun 1. money given as a tip, a present, or almsverb 2. to give such money to (a person) Origin: from Persian bakhshish, from bakhshidan to give; related to Sanskrit bhaksati he enjoys

Unearthing Shakti

shakti [shuk-thee]: 1. the female principle or organ of generative power.2. the wife of a deity, especially of Shiva. From Sanskrit sákti power

The Sari Story

sari [sa-ari]: noun, also saree, long, wrapping garment of silk or cotton worn by Hindu women, 1785, from Hindi sari, from Prakrit sadi, from Sanskrit sati “garment, petticoat.”
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